Where was Bill Barr in the weeks leading up to the 2020 election?

Things that may have happened that I could be wrong about, pt 1.

I spend a lot of time thinking about how things happen and what’s required for them to happen in the systems where they happen. I wouldn’t recommend doing this but since I do it I’m going to turn some of these thoughts into content. I don’t know how one becomes truly qualified to do this so I don’t think I’m qualified to do it, but I have experience in the development of technical systems to enhance organizational capabilities and I have experience with various levels of management in a wide variety of organizations, so I consider myself broadly qualified to understand many of the logistical requirements of a conspiracy. I’ve also worked with a great big variety of people in a wide range of capabilities and dynamics, so I’m pretty comfortable thinking about people in realistic ways — although I’m obviously wrong sometimes because everyone is wrong sometimes.

Conspiracy Analysis

Some conspiracy theories seem immediately false to me because it seems impossible to achieve the operational requirements of the plot, particularly as they relate to training, experience, staffing, record keeping, finance, etc. A successful conspiracy at scale in any type of organization leaves a footprint because people are behaving in ways that are contrary to the intended purpose of the system. We can assume people will try their best to keep it a secret but we shouldn’t assume they won’t fuck up. People fuck up at all sorts of stuff all the time. Doctors sew up patients with tools in them sometimes. 🤷‍♂️

Small conspiracies are obviously best so you can always assume that whatever you’re seeing is trying to be as small as it can. None of this is particularly groundbreaking stuff, we see it in media and we see it in historical documentaries, and sometimes we even see it in the news when people get caught.

Conspiracy theories are real and they are often unimaginably complicated so conspiracy analysis is required.

Check out this article for a reminder of Bill Barrs disappearance in the period leading up to the election:

He was probably doing something because people continue to exist even when they’re not in a media spotlight. Also, at the time I remember reading a story about how he was travelling around although I didn’t save the article.

Photo from the confirmation hearing.

Bill Barr had a key role through a big portion of the Trump presidency but not all of it. He came onboard as part of a GOP effort to manage some of the struggles the Trump team was having engaging with the systems of government as a result of their inexperience. Bill Barr didn’t seem like he authentically supported Trump and his absence in the period leading up to the election can be easily explained by that.

A theory built around information like this seems particularly conspiratorial and it could definitely be disproven as a result of information I don’t have access to.

What makes a conspiracy?

An opaque and confusing public sphere is a ripe breeding ground for actual and imagined conspiracy. I think it’s important to note that people get involved in complex conspiracies in a wide variety of ways. Some people lead, some people follow and know they’re following the leaders of the conspiracy, and some people follow and they don’t know they’re following the leaders of the conspiracy. This final group includes people with varying levels of potential awareness or suspicion of the conspiracy.

So what am I saying?

More transparency and an open government would be better for almost everyone everywhere.

You can hire me to be a wizard if you want. I’m like a bargain basement Sherlock Holmes combined with an off-brand Radagast.

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